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The Relationship Between Biotechnology CTE Students and Non-CTE Peers with Respect to Self-Efficacy for Achievement, Attendance Support, and College and Career Readiness

Francesca Florio Salvadore, Johnson & Wales University

Abstract

Urban education settings often struggle to meet the academic needs of students to best prepare them for postsecondary study or career readiness (ACTE, 2015; Gordon, 2014; Treschan & Mehrotra, 2014). Consequently, students who enter college may not have the baseline skills to be successful and may take longer to graduate, or may drop out altogether (ACTE, 2015; Stone & Lewis, 2012; Treshcan & Mehrotra, 2014). One program shown to improve student preparedness for college and career is Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in urban areas.^ In examining difference between students in an urban high school Biotechnology CTE program and non-CTE students with respect to self-efficacy for achievement, attendance support, and college and career readiness, this convergent mixed methods design addressed the following research questions: 1. Is there a significant difference between students in an urban high school Biotechnology CTE program and non-CTE students with respect to self-efficacy for achievement, attendance support, and college and career readiness after controlling for initial differences in self-reported grades? 2. Is there a significant difference between students in an urban high school Biotechnology CTE program and non-CTE students with respect to the following demographic variables: self-reported grades, gender, and race? 3. How do students in an urban high school Biotechnology CTE program and non-CTE students describe their school experience with respect to self-efficacy for achievement, attendance support, and college and career readiness?^ Quantitatively, a survey determined if significant differences existed between 12th grade students in an urban high school Biotechnology CTE program (n=21) and non-CTE (n=69) students. Qualitatively, conducted focus groups further determined if differences existed between CTE students (n=14) and non-CTE students ( n=14).^ Quantitatively, there were no significant differences found within dimensions. Qualitative findings indicated that CTE students felt more prepared for college and career than non-CTE students. CTE students reported that challenging teachers prepared them for college and career, while non-CTE students reported that encouraging teachers prepared them.^ The findings from this study may help school, district and national educational leaders increase CTE programming in order to provide students with more job-embedded training and a more contextualized approach to traditional course-offerings. ^

Subject Area

Education|Vocational education

Recommended Citation

Salvadore, Francesca Florio, "The Relationship Between Biotechnology CTE Students and Non-CTE Peers with Respect to Self-Efficacy for Achievement, Attendance Support, and College and Career Readiness" (2016). Dissertation & Theses Collection. AAI10106161.
http://scholarsarchive.jwu.edu/dissertations/AAI10106161